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Forget global warming: Welcome to the new Ice Age

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From Loren Nelson, NelsonEcom
Internet Solutions | Visual Design
Web Sites, Podcasts, Multimedia, & Usability Engineering

February 29, 2008 – Vol. XII, No. 07

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NetBits is the weekly newsletter keeping your informed of various chatter and other tidbits of potential relevance.

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In This Issue:

Item One: Unique Hotels and Alternative Lodgings
Item Two: Forget global warming: Welcome to the new Ice Age
Item Three: Nutrition Tip – Calcium Supplements
Item Four: Word of the Week
Item Five: How do thieves steal an identity?
Do you know…

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1. Unique Hotels and Alternative Lodgings
 

Looking for an unusual place to stay? Bookmark these websites now.

www.budgettravel.com

 
2. Forget global warming: Welcome to the new Ice Age
 

From the (Canadian) National Post

Snow cover over North America and much of Siberia, Mongolia and China is greater than at any time since 1966.

The U.S. National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) reported that many American cities and towns suffered record cold temperatures in January and early February. According to the NCDC, the average temperature in January "was -0.3 F cooler than the 1901-2000 (20th century) average."

China is surviving its most brutal winter in a century. Temperatures in the normally balmy south were so low for so long that some middle-sized cities went days and even weeks without electricity because once power lines had toppled it was too cold or too icy to repair them.

There have been so many snow and ice storms in Ontario and Quebec in the past two months that the real estate market has felt the pinch as home buyers have stayed home rather than venturing out looking for new houses.

In just the first two weeks of February, Toronto received 70 cm of snow, smashing the record of 66.6 cm for the entire month set back in the pre-SUV, pre-Kyoto, pre-carbon footprint days of 1950.

And remember the Arctic Sea ice? The ice we were told so hysterically last fall had melted to its "lowest levels on record? Never mind that those records only date back as far as 1972 and that there is anthropological and geological evidence of much greater melts in the past.

The ice is back.

Gilles Langis, a senior forecaster with the Canadian Ice Service in Ottawa, says the Arctic winter has been so severe the ice has not only recovered, it is actually 10 to 20 cm thicker in many places than at this time last year.

OK, so one winter does not a climate make. It would be premature to claim an Ice Age is looming just because we have had one of our most brutal winters in decades.

But if environmentalists and environment reporters can run around shrieking about the manmade destruction of the natural order every time a robin shows up on Georgian Bay two weeks early, then it is at least fair game to use this winter’s weather stories to wonder whether the alarmist are being a tad premature.

And it’s not just anecdotal evidence that is piling up against the climate-change dogma.

According to Robert Toggweiler of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton University and Joellen Russell, assistant professor of biogeochemical dynamics at the University of Arizona — two prominent climate modellers — the computer models that show polar ice-melt cooling the oceans, stopping the circulation of warm equatorial water to northern latitudes and triggering another Ice Age (a la the movie The Day After Tomorrow) are all wrong.

"We missed what was right in front of our eyes," says Prof. Russell. It’s not ice melt but rather wind circulation that drives ocean currents northward from the tropics. Climate models until now have not properly accounted for the wind’s effects on ocean circulation, so researchers have compensated by over-emphasizing the role of manmade warming on polar ice melt.

But when Profs. Toggweiler and Russell rejigged their model to include the 40-year cycle of winds away from the equator (then back towards it again), the role of ocean currents bringing warm southern waters to the north was obvious in the current Arctic warming.

Last month, Oleg Sorokhtin, a fellow of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences, shrugged off manmade climate change as "a drop in the bucket." Showing that solar activity has entered an inactive phase, Prof. Sorokhtin advised people to "stock up on fur coats."

He is not alone. Kenneth Tapping of our own National Research Council, who oversees a giant radio telescope focused on the sun, is convinced we are in for a long period of severely cold weather if sunspot activity does not pick up soon.

The last time the sun was this inactive, Earth suffered the Little Ice Age that lasted about five centuries and ended in 1850. Crops failed through killer frosts and drought. Famine, plague and war were widespread. Harbours froze, so did rivers, and trade ceased.

It’s way too early to claim the same is about to happen again, but then it’s way too early for the hysteria of the global warmers, too.

 
3. Nutrition Tip – Calcium Supplements
 

Besides being a major component of bones and teeth, calcium is also needed for muscles to contract properly, blood to clot and nerves to function. And yet calcium cannot do its job without Vitamin D. Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium and fine-tune calcium levels in the blood. Recently, researchers have realized that Americans may not get enough D and that we may need more than current dietary recommendations. All-natural, completely safe calcium supplements such as Calcium-Magnesium, Synerpro (240 Tablets) and/or Liquid Calcium are a great way to get more of these vital, important nutrients. These products provide nutrients that support the structural system and aid in the maintenance of teeth, bones, tendons and skin.

 
4. Word of the Week
 

Bonapartism • \BOH-nuh-par-tiz-um\ • noun

: a policy supporting dictatorial rule usually by a military leader who has ostensibly received a popular mandate

Example Sentence:
Public fears that the new president would shift to Bonapartism were fueled by his early attempts to undermine the parliament.

Did you know?
Napoleon I (Napoleon Bonaparte) came to power in France by military coup in 1799 and ruled as emperor from 1804 until he was forced from power in 1815. The year 1815 was clearly a bad one for Bonaparte: he was defeated at Waterloo by the Duke of Wellington and sent into exile. Coincidentally, 1815 was also the year that marked the debut in English of "Bonapartism," the word derived from his name. "Waterloo," a term for a decisive defeat such as the one Napoleon suffered, had come into general English use by 1816.

 
5. How do thieves steal an identity?

 

Identity theft starts with the misuse of your personally identifying information such as your name and Social Security number, credit card numbers, or other financial account information. For identity thieves, this information is as good as gold.

Skilled identity thieves may use a variety of methods to get hold of your information, including:

  • Dumpster Diving. They rummage through trash looking for bills or other paper with your personal information on it.
  • Skimming. They steal credit/debit card numbers by using a special storage device when processing your card.
  • Phishing. They pretend to be financial institutions or companies and send spam or pop-up messages to get you to reveal your personal information.
  • Changing Your Address. They divert your billing statements to another location by completing a change of address form.
  • Old-Fashioned Stealing. They steal wallets and purses; mail, including bank and credit card statements; pre-approved credit offers; and new checks or tax information. They steal personnel records, or bribe employees who have access.
  • Pretexting. They use false pretenses to obtain your personal information from financial institutions, telephone companies, and other sources.
 
6. Do You Know…
 
On this day:

  • First African American wins Academy Award (1940)
    McDaniel was an African-American singer-songwriter, comedienne, stage actress, radio performer, and television star. She appeared in over 300 films and is best known for her role as Mammy in the iconic 1939 film Gone with the Wind, a performance that earned her the first Academy Award ever presented to an African American.
 
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Mahalo,
Loren
NelsonEcom
714-553-7681
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